Print. The word plié means “bent,” and demi means half — just as demitasse means half a cup, demi monde means half a world, […] What does Plie mean? The lowest rank. Performed in all of the five basic foot positions, pliés may be shallow, so that the dancer’s heels remain on the floor Using the legs and feet gives the motion much more fluidity, and it also places less strain on the knees. This article was co-authored by Geraldine Grace Johns. a movement in which the knees are bent while the back is held straight. Every ballet class begins with pliés followed by tendus and then dégagés. As with a demi-plié, the upper body should be straight throughout the entire movement with the shoulders down, back straight, head up, tailbone dropped, and stomach tight. You can perform each version from all five ballet positions. When you hear of "32 fouettés" in Swan Lake or some other ballet, this is what they mean. Plie literally means, “to bend” and this is performed as a bend in the knee both small and big or in French, demi and grande. Which of the following animal names traces its immediate origin to Portuguese? Geraldine Grace Johns is a Professional Ballerina and the Owner of Grace Ballet in New York and Los Angeles. In order to perform a grand plié , the movement will consist of a full and deep bend with thighs horizontal. In its most basic form, when someone performs a plié they simply bend their knees. One such correction: The cue to "lift from the back of the leg" or "lift from underneath" in grands battements, développés and similar movements. There are two version of a plié—a demi-plié and a grand-plié. She has studied with the Royal Academy of Dance in London and taught for the Kudo School of Ballet in Yokohama. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. It is composed by a series of movement sequences that aim to put together what the dancer worked on in the barre; including coordination, strength, control, agility and flexibility, among others. a classic ballet practice posture with back erect and knees bent. While you descend, your lower right arm (from wrist to elbow) moves outward and slightly up, no higher than the level of your hips. One such correction: The cue to "lift from the back of the leg" or "lift from underneath" in grands battements, développés and similar movements. 1890–95;